Intro CJ Ch 5.4   Multiple Choice Questions (29)

Evidence that requires an inference be made by the finder of fact.

  • Circumstantial Evidence
  • Foreperson
  • Bifurcated Trial
  • Hearsay

The Sixth Amendment guarantees the right of the people to be given fair notice of the charges against them.

  • Bifurcated Trial
  • Jury Nullification
  • Aggravating Circumstances
  • Right to Notice of Accusations

Legal rules that govern what, how, and for what purpose evidence can be admitted into court.

  • Charge to the Jury
  • Rules of Evidence
  • Hearsay
  • Aggravating Circumstances

An individual liberty guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment; the basic purpose of the right is to prevent accused persons from being found guilty of a crime in an unfair way.

  • Hung Jury
  • Right to a Trial by Jury
  • Direct Evidence
  • Foreperson

A trial without a jury, in which the judge serves as the fact-finder.

  • Testimonial Evidence
  • Closing Arguments
  • Alibi
  • Bench Trial

The leader and spokesperson for a jury who is usually responsible for reading the jury’s verdict in court.

  • Foreperson
  • Rules of Evidence
  • Sequester
  • Challenge for Cause

A request after a legal judgement has been made that a new trial be given because of significant legal errors in the first trial.

  • Mitigating Circumstances
  • Aggravating Circumstances
  • Motion for a New Trial
  • Voir Dire

A type of challenge used in the voir dire process that excludes a potential juror for a stated reason that is allowed by law.

  • Voir Dire
  • Confrontation Clause
  • Challenge for Cause
  • Rules of Evidence

Situational factors that can serve to reduce the culpability of a criminal act, such as the defendant’s age, metal disease, or lack of a prior criminal record.

  • Sequester
  • Right to a Public Trial
  • Mitigating Circumstances
  • Hung Jury

The unconstitutional practice of prosecuting a person twice for the same offense within the same jurisdiction.

  • Double Jeopardy
  • Right to a Public Trial
  • Rebuttal
  • Hearsay

A clause of the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution which provides that “in all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right…to be confronted with the witnesses against him.”

  • Motion for a New Trial
  • Mitigating Circumstances
  • Bifurcated Trial
  • Confrontation Clause

A finding of not guilty by a jury that believes the defendant does not deserve punishment.

  • Rules of Evidence
  • Testimonial Evidence
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Nullification

The Sixth Amendment guarantees criminal defendants the right to face their accusers in court.

  • Right to a Speedy Trial
  • Hearsay
  • Peremptory Challenge
  • Right to Confront Witnesses

A judge’s explanation of the applicable law to the jury at the conclusion of a criminal trial prior to jury deliberation.

  • Mitigating Circumstances
  • Testimonial Evidence
  • Charge to the Jury
  • Jury Instructions

A legal defense based on the claim of being elsewhere when a crime occurred.

  • Right to a Speedy Trial
  • Right to a Public Trial
  • Charge to the Jury
  • Alibi

Rules established by the SCOTUS in an effort to codify the many rules of presenting evidence in federal criminal courts.

  • Right to a Public Trial
  • Right to Notice of Accusations
  • Federal Rules of Evidence
  • Right to Confront Witnesses

Situational factors that increase the seriousness or culpability of a criminal act, such as the heinousness of the crime.

  • Foreperson
  • Peremptory Challenge
  • Aggravating Circumstances
  • Bifurcated Trial

An individual liberty guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment. The purpose is to keep justice out in the open.

  • Mitigating Circumstances
  • Right to a Trial by Jury
  • Right to a Public Trial
  • Hung Jury

Evidence presented by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else.

  • Challenge for Cause
  • Hearsay
  • Jury Nullification
  • Charge to the Jury

A jury unable to reach a decision as to the guilt of the defendant; results in a mistrial.

  • Right to a Public Trial
  • Hung Jury
  • Bench Trial
  • Closing Arguments

An oral or written assertion offered into evidence as proof of a fact.

  • Right to a Speedy Trial
  • Closing Arguments
  • Bifurcated Trial
  • Testimonial Evidence

An individual liberty guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment; the basic purpose of the right is to prevent accused persons from languishing in jail.

  • Motion for a New Trial
  • Right to a Public Trial
  • Circumstantial Evidence
  • Right to a Speedy Trial

A reiteration of each side’s important arguments at the conclusion of a criminal trial.

  • Double Jeopardy
  • Challenge for Cause
  • Circumstantial Evidence
  • Closing Arguments

A trial that has a first phase where guilt is determined, and then a second phase where the sentence is determined.

  • Hung Jury
  • Foreperson
  • Closing Arguments
  • Bifurcated Trial

The phase of a criminal trial where an effort by one side is made to refute the evidence of the other side.

  • Hung Jury
  • Rebuttal
  • Federal Rules of Evidence
  • Circumstantial Evidence

Jury selection process of questioning prospective jurors, to ascertain their qualifications and determine any basis for a challenge.

  • Right to a Trial by Jury
  • Hearsay
  • Voir Dire
  • Right to Notice of Accusations

Evidence that proves the truth of an assertion without the need for any inferences.

  • Closing Arguments
  • Federal Rules of Evidence
  • Right to a Trial by Jury
  • Direct Evidence

To isolate members of a jury so they are not exposed to outside information about a case.

  • Hearsay
  • Sequester
  • Federal Rules of Evidence
  • Circumstantial Evidence

A court may grant each side in a civil or criminal trial the right to exclude a certain number of prospective jurors without cause or giving a reason.

  • Right to a Public Trial
  • Hung Jury
  • Peremptory Challenge
  • Rules of Evidence