CRJ OER CJ CH 3.4 Multiple Choice Questions (23)

A type of criminal defense where the accused claims that they would not have done the criminal act if it were not for substantial encouragement by police.

  • Substantial Capacity Test
  • Mistake of Law
  • Parsons v. State (1887)
  • Entrapment

A ____________________ and circumstances surrounding an event can sometimes be a defense to criminal charges.

  • Entrapment
  • Deadly Force 
  • Parsons v. State (1887) 
  • Mistake of Fact

A legal defense based on the idea that a small harm can sometimes be necessary to prevent a greater harm from occurring; another name for the necessity defense. 

  • Solicitation 
  • Involuntary Intoxication 
  • Justification 
  • Necessity Defense

An error as to the facts and circumstances surrounding an event can sometimes be a defense to criminal charges; a error of law is never an excuse. 

  • Entrapment 
  • Mistake Defense 
  • Mistake of Fact 
  • Solicitation

A criminal defense based on the logic that the defendant should not be held liable because he or she acted criminally due to an inebriation that the defendant did not cause. 

  • Imminent Danger 
  • Involuntary Intoxication 
  • M’Naghten Rule 
  • Not Guilty By Reason of Insanity

A potential harm that is likely to occur at any moment. 

  • Self-defense 
  • Lesser of Two Evils Defense 
  • Irresistible Impulse Test 
  • Imminent Danger

A plea that must be entered (in some jurisdictions) when the defendant is planning to use a “guilty but mentally ill”   defense. 

  • M’Naghten Rule 
  • Irresistible Impulse Test 
  • Mistake Defense 
  • Not Guilty By Reason of Insanity

An insanity defense test that asks if the defendant could or could not control his or her actions. 

  • Non-deadly Force 
  • Lesser of Two Evils Defense 
  • Irresistible Impulse Test
  • Insanity Defense

The crime of inducing another person to commit a crime, usually for money. 

  • Lesser of Two Evils Defense 
  • Excuse 
  • Irresistible Impulse Test 
  • Solicitation

A type of criminal defense where the accused admits to the criminal act, but maintains that they are not blameworthy because of extenuating circumstances. 

  • Mistake of Fact 
  • Excuse 
  • Mistake Defense 
  • Substantial Capacity Test

A state of inebriation knowingly and voluntarily entered into; not a viable criminal defense

  • Non-deadly Force 
  • Irresistible Impulse Test 
  • Duress 
  • Voluntary Intoxication

A criminal defense based on the idea that a person who commits a crime because of a mental disease or defect is not culpable. 

  • Entrapment 
  • Duress 
  • Justification 
  • Insanity Defense

Force that is not likely to cause death or serious bodily injury. 

  • Imminent Danger 
  • Lesser of Two Evils Defense 
  • Mistake of Fact 
  • Non-deadly Force

The Model Penal Code test for insanity that includes elements of the M’Naughten rule as well as elements of the irresistible impulse test. 

  • Justification 
  • Coercion 
  • Mistake of Law
  • Substantial Capacity Test

A legal defense based on the idea that a small harm can sometimes be necessary to prevent a greater harm from occurring; another name for the necessity defense. 

  • Lesser of Two Evils Defense
  • Parsons v. State (1887 )
  • Non-deadly Force 
  • Voluntary Intoxication

The practice (usually criminal) of using force or the threat of force to gain compliance. 

  • Lesser of Two Evils Defense 
  • Parsons v. State (1887) 
  • Duress 
  • Coercion

An important Alabama Supreme Court case decided in 1887 that established the Irresistible Impulse Test of insanity. 

  • Non-deadly Force 
  • Justification 
  • Parsons v. State (1887) 
  • Not Guilty By Reason of Insanity

A criminal defense that allows for the use of force to protect one’s person from harm, as well as the protection of others.

  • Self-defense 
  • M’Naghten Rule 
  • Coercion 
  • Involuntary Intoxication

A legal defense available to a person who does something against their will under threat of harm.

  • Duress 
  • Self-defense 
  • Necessity Defense 
  • Mistake Defense

A legal defense based on a claim that the act, while usually criminal, was right under the particular circumstances. 

  • Necessity Defense 
  • Justification
  • Imminent Danger 
  • Lesser of Two Evils Defense

A____________is never an excuse. 

  • Mistake of Law 
  • M’Naghten Rule 
  • Deadly Force 
  • Coercion

An amount of force likely to cause serious bodily injury or death if used against a person. 

  • Parsons v. State (1887)
  • Not Guilty By Reason of Insanity 
  • Mistake of Law 
  • Deadly Force

A legal test of insanity that hinges in the defendant’s inability to know right from wrong; originated in an English court case in 1843, making it the first major test for insanity.

  • Coercion
  • M’Naghten Rule 
  • Lesser of Two Evils Defense 
  • Duress